Rotem Nahlieli

Working with remote freelancers

I can still hear the squeaky sounds of the 4 brand new, state-of-the-art Mac Pros, trying to escape from their polystyrene prison and run free towards what will be their new home soon. It was back in 2007 and my business partner and I just completed 3 weeks of backbreaking work – sanding, painting and refurbishing our first London studio in Soho. Continue reading →

Posted by Rotem Nahlieli in Blog, entrepreneurship, 0 comments

This is Roooster

As an owner of a creative studio in London, I have very few in-house employees. Like many other design companies, we are heavily depending on freelances to help with the ongoing projects. This is a good thing: our work is not limited by skill, location or staff. Working with freelancers, both on-site and remotely, allow our studio to adapt fast, be very versatile in style and discipline, keep our overheads low and work with exciting artists and clients from around the world. But this flexibility comes at a price: The grueling and constantly recurring task of chasing after available freelance artists or scouting for new ones.

Being a design professional is supposed to be living the dream, to challenge ourselves with new ways of thinking and explore our creative boundaries. Starting our own studios meant we felt responsible enough to take on bigger projects, so we get it: there are managerial tasks, more accounting and there’s also constant hiring of freelancers. Gone are the days of setting up shop and working with an in-house staff of 9 to 5 artists. We are constantly on the lookout for talents who meet the specific requirements of each project. These high quality professionals, are not just waiting for us to call them: they actively search for projects. 

In the domains of high quality design and creative services, there is very little comfort in using freelancer recruitment services. Even if you think you may have found the right person for the task using one of these services, you still have to spend a lot of time going through their portfolio, understanding what was their part in every project, where creative projects are often collaborative, and trying to learn from colleagues what is it like to work with this person, as the match needs to be personal as well as professional. The challenge is even bigger when trying to find a remote artist to work with.

This is why we started Roooster: We had enough browsing through hundreds of online portfolios and fancy websites that claim to understand your creative needs. Or even worse, online services that offer useless ranking systems and focusing mainly on low cost bids rather than quality. You know these sites, those which are avoided by self respecting freelance designers and artists. In Roooster we want to allow creative studio owners to share freelance information with their peers – who else can vouch for their professional contacts?

Posted by Rotem Nahlieli in entrepreneurship, 0 comments